Events

Guest speaker

Presenter:

Rhonda Archie

Date:

05-12-2017

Time:

12:00PM-1:00PM

Location:

CE706 Clinical Support and Education Building

MUII Dissertation Defense- Rhonda Archie

Information Technology (IT) Interconnectivity in a Rural Health Setting: A Conceptual Model  

Current and past developments in Health (HIT) systems in rural settings have focused on the use of electronic health records by health professionals. These systems were conducted in standalone mode, or coupled with the integration of HIT systems of two or more other HIT systems. In addition, this lack of interconnectivity involved diminished coordination in information sharing among the systems (Bahensky 2008; McCullough 2009). Grossman (2006) and Kevin (2008) investigated the state of HIT systems’ interconnectivity using networks in a rural health setting to promote sharing and communication of HIT systems. The authors found scanty information and limited initiatives to interconnect HIT systems. According to these authors, rural health settings face problems of purchase decision and implementation of HIT incorporating interconnectivity of the systems. More recent studies allude to the importance and need for rural health settings to foster interconnectivity among existing systems (Moidduddin 2007; Blumenthal 2009).  Thus, there is also a need for using HIT systems that are proficient HIT interconnectivity systems. Brodkin (2007) noted enabling the HIT systems to communicate and share information effectively and efficiently can be achieved through HIT interconnectivity of existing systems for both rural and urban settings. The phenomenon of “HIT interconnectivity” being investigated in this study is not well understood in the literature (Trimmer, Pumphrey, and Wiggins, 2002). The proposed “Six-Factor Information Technology Interconnectivity (SFITI) Model” that rural health clinic administrators can use during HIT decision-making processes to generate new solutions provides an innovative approach. In addition, the proposed “Information Technology Interconnectivity in Rural Health (ITIRH) Survey” will serve as a new instrument for conducting research associated with HIT systems’ need, diffusion, implementation, reflection, interconnectivity, and environment. The proposed SFITI model and proposed ITIRH survey, novel forms of HIT innovation, are being developed. The purpose is to improve the structure and dynamics of HIT systems’ efficiency, clinical effectiveness, cost effectiveness, and productivity in rural health settings.

Guest speaker

Presenter:

Saad Khan

Date:

05-11-2017

Time:

1:00PM-2:00PM

Location:

240 Naka Hall

MUII Comprehensive Exam- Saad Khan

Comparison of histone modifications across species

A cell’s identity is determined by distinct sets of genes that are expressed at a given point of time. An important factor in determining which set of genes are expressed is the cells epigenome. Epigenomes are known to play an important role across all eukaryotic species in gene regulation, genome integrity, dosage compensation and development. Histone modifications are an important component of the epigenome. These histone marks are post translational modifications that take place on the n-terminal tails of histone proteins. The growth of complex and heterogeneous epigenomic data sets has led to the development of “Comparative Epigenomics”. Comparative epigenomics has three dimensions namely ‘comparison of the epigenome of same individual over a period of time or different tissue types’, ‘comparison between different individuals of the same species’, and ‘comparison of epigenomes of different species’. Comparison of histone modification across time-points, individuals or species is crucial in understanding how epigenomes evolve over time. In this work we propose informatics approaches to address three specific aims: 1) Understand how histone modifications evolve between species and across different tissues. 2) Study the factors that contribute/drive change in epigenome across species. 3) How epigenomes change across various cancer subtypes and what factors drive that change. Lastly, we will use comparative epigenomic features to better predict enhancer promoter looping. A better understanding of how these histone modifications co-appear and evolve with respect to sequence across species would help in coming up with better models of transcriptional network evolution.

Seminar Series

Presenter:

Tim Green

Date:

04-24-2017

Time:

11:00AM-12:00PM

Location:

2206A Student Center

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