Events

Data-Driven Discovery Research Initiatives Colloquium

Presenter:

Dr. Lei Zhao

Date:

04-18-2019

Time:

3:30pm-5:00pm

Location:

Leadership Auditorium, 2501 Student Center

Climate-driven urban heat and its adaptation at a large scale

Abstract

Among many globally recognized environmental problems such as water scarcity, air pollution, and energy security, heat stress is one of the most severe climate-driven threats to the human society. The situation is further exacerbated in urban areas by urban heat islands (UHIs). Absent measures to ameliorate them, the problems associated with heat stress are expected to intensify due to rapid urban development coupled with climate change. One significant barrier to heat mitigation through urban engineering is the lack of quantitative attribution of the various surface processes toUHI intensity. In this seminar, the intrinsic mechanism of UHI and its quantitative attribution at a large scale will be presented. Using a newly developed sub-grid modeling framework, I will demonstrate how surface aerodynamic, hydrological and anthropogenic processes contribute to UHIs. I will further discuss how these mechanistic insights could be used to assess the effectiveness of various commonly-proposed urban adaptation strategies individually and collectively. UHIs also interact with heat waves and climate change. I will also present how UHIs interact with heat waves under present-day and future warmer climates, and how global urban temperatures change with climate change.

 

Bio

Dr. Lei Zhao is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). He received his Ph.D. in atmospheric and environmental science from School of Forestry and Environmental Studies at Yale University. Before joining at UIUC, Dr. Zhao was a postdoctoral research fellow in the Program in Science, Technology and Environmental Policy (STEP) at Princeton University. Dr. Zhao obtained his B.S. degree in Physics and Atmospheric Physics from Nanjing University in China. His research concerns the physical and engineering processes in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer where most human activities and environmental systems are concentrated, with a particular focus on built surfaces and urban environments. He combines theory, numerical modeling, remote sensing and in situobservations, and cutting-edge statistical methods to study environmental fluid mechanics and land-atmosphere interaction that relate to urban environments, microclimatology and hydrology, climate change, climate impacts and adaptation.

Data-Driven Discovery Research Initiatives Colloquium

Presenter:

Dr. David Ussery

Date:

04-04-2019

Time:

3:30PM-5:00PM

Location:

Leadership Auditorium, 2501 Student Center

Seminar Series

Presenter:

Chunhui Xu

Date:

02-28-2019

Time:

3:30PM-4:30PM

Location:

Leadership Auditorium, 2501 Student Center

Computational prediction of ubiquitination proteins using evolutionary profiles and functional domains

Ubiquitination, as a post-translational modification, is a crucial biological process in cell signaling, apoptosis and localization. Identification of ubiquitination proteins is of fundamental importance for understanding molecular mechanisms in biological systems and diseases. Although high-throughput experimental studies using mass spectrometry have identified many ubiquitination proteins and ubiquitination sites, the vast majority of ubiquitination proteins remain undiscovered, even in well studied model organisms. To reduce experimental costs, computational methods have been introduced to predict ubiquitination sites, but the accuracy is unsatisfactory. If we can predict whether a protein can be ubiquitinated or not, it is meaningful by itself and helpful for predicting ubiquitination sites. However, all the computational methods so far can only predict ubiquitination sites. In this study, we developed the computational method for predicting ubiquitination proteins without relying on ubiquitination site prediction. The method extracts features from sequence conservation information via a grey system model, as well as functional domain annotation and subcellular localization. Together with the feature analysis and application of the relief feature selection algorithm, the results of 5-fold cross-validation on three datasets achieved a high accuracy of 0.898, with a Matthew’s correlation coefficient of 0.796.

Data-Driven Discovery Research Initiatives Colloquium

Presenter:

Dr. Bill Hersh

Date:

03-07-2019

Time:

3:30PM-5:00pm

Location:

Leadership Auditorium, 2501 Student Center

Information Retrieval from the Electronic Health Records for Patient Cohort Discovery

The widespread adoption of electronic health records has made patient data for re-use. One use case for such re-use is the ability to identify patient cohorts for recruitment into clinical research studies. This talk will describe the use of information retrieval techniques and their evaluation for patient cohort discovery as well as challenges to research involving patient data.

William Hersh, MD, FACMI, FAMIA, FACP is Professor and Chair of the Department of Medical Informatics & Clinical Epidemiology in the School of Medicine at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) in Portland, Oregon, USA. Dr. Hersh is a leader and innovator in biomedical informatics both in education and research.

In education, he serves as Director of OHSU’s Biomedical Informatics Graduate Program, which includes two master’s degrees (research and professional), a PhD degree, and Graduate Certificate. Dr. Hersh also spearheaded OHSU’s efforts in distance learning for biomedical informatics, which is available up to the master’s degree level.  He also conceptualized and implemented the first offering of the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) 10×10 (“ten by ten”) program, which has provided education to over 2500 health care professionals and others in biomedical informatics. He also serves as Co-Editor with Robert Hoyt, MD of the textbook, Health Informatics: Practical Guide, Seventh Edition (Lulu.com, 2018), which is available in paper and eBook format.

Dr. Hersh also serves as Director of OHSU’s Research Fellowship in Biomedical Informatics, which is funded by a training grant from the National Library of Medicine, and as Associate Program Director of OHSU’s ACGME-accredited Clinical Informatics Fellowship. Dr. Hersh has also been involved in other global efforts to expand informatics capacity through education, collaborating with colleagues at Hospital Italiano of Buenos Aires, Argentina, in Singapore, and elsewhere.

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